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MARIE CLAUDINIE SINGS AT UN

CONTACT US

EMAIL US
EMAIL MAIRE CLAUDINE
Phone: 347.465.4045
In USA:
KUKI NDIHO RWANDA
ORPHANS SUPPORT PROJECT
1186 FULTON STREET
BROOKLYN, NY 11216 USA

In Rwanda:
KUKI NDIHO RWANDA
Paroisse Ste FAMILLE
PO. BOX 442 KIGALI, RWANDA

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SNEAKER DRIVE

Kuki Ndiho partners with community organizations, schools of all levels, religious and cultural institutions to gather, collect and ship much-needed clothing items to its orphans in Rwanda. Please write us if interested in learning more at info@kukindiho.org Please include photos of yourself or your family to include with the individual clothing items so that we can thank you on our web site and so those to who receive the items will also know. snd

Annual Sneaker Drive

Seventh and eighth grader at the Christian Formation Student at St. Vincent Martyr Catholic Church in MADISON, NEW JERSEY are holding a sneaker drive for Rwandan Orphans through the holiday season. They will be collecting new or gently used sneakers in all sizes now. Please contact teacher Henry Page at EMAIL HERE

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ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Shoes from Japan were given to Rwandan orphans in Kigali via “Why do I exist  Foundation”

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225 pairs of sports shoes from Japan were given to Rwandan orphans children at  Muhima Primary School in Kigali via “Why do I exist ” /KUKI NDIHO RWANDA ORPHANS SUPPORT PROJECT.
We are so thankful to Our Japanese Sister Izumi Yamashita for mobilizing 150 Japanese people & 6 Japanese Associations to contribute and co-organizing this humanitarian & charitable action in Japan for Rwandan orphans called “Love for Rwanda” in collaboration with the Association of University Women in Japan as well as the former president of the Association.
On behalf of our Rwandan Orphans children, our staff volunteers,
Muhima Primary school and our Founder Marie Claudine MUKAMABANO, We Say: THANK YOU!
May God continue to bless you..
Peace
www.whydoiexist.org
Tel: 347 465 4045 ( USA officer)
E- mail: claudinepeace@gmail.com

Accomplishents

200 children studying in primary school, high (secondary) school
>> Annual Peace Convention
>> Presentations at New York City & New Jesery  schools
>> Partnership Programs
>> New web sites, other media initiatives
>> Start of Documentary Film Project

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MUHIMA CHILDCARE  in  RWANDA , KIGALI

Kuki Ndiho members, volunteers organizing Childcare activities in Muhima sector at Muhima Primary School on Saturdays

The objective of the activity is to gather kids from and near Muhima Primary School during their free times to that they could play and learn together moral values instead of engaging in other bad behaviors such as adultery, drug abuse, and drug addiction and so on.

Volunteers facilitate the plays and games for kids and youth then after discuss with children and youths on how to prevent the HIV, other STDs and child rights and to claim whenever violated. This activity is done every Saturday from 2pm up to 5 pm; and about 100 children and youths attend the event and 30% of them are girls. Because of this lower number of girls’ participation; sensitization should be highly done so that the society understands the importance of game and sport in growth of girl child.

Based on what is done at MUHIMA PRIMARY SCHOOL (games, discussions…) this activity is very useful to children and youths because it serves as weekend hobbies and children and youths learn more moral values and fundamental life skills from it.

The success of this event inspires to the volunteer continue childcare in the future and they are targeting to have different mix team for kids and youth where they will continue learn moral values and develop their talents

The involvement of community leaders (sectors through youth councils), parents in the planning and implementation this childcare activity is needed.

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IN NEW YORK CITY,USA

UNICEF at Baruch presented “International NGOs: Do They Do More Harm Than Good?.” The session was moderated by Prof. Christina Balboa of the Baruch College School of Public Affairs, with welcoming remarks by Dean David S. Birdsell, School of Public Affairs.

Panelists were Prof. John Casey, School of Public Affairs, Ms. Marie-Claudine Mukamabano, founder and CEO of Kuki Ndiho Foundation, and Ms. Leslie hawke, founder of OvidiuRom and President of The Alex Fund.

Prof. Casey set the stage by saying that there were many statistics that could be used to make the case that international Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) can, at times, without intention, do more harm than good; however, the vast majority of international NGOs have the most altruistic of motives and do help to implement the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in developing countries.

Prof. Casey used an example of an inventor who determined that good could be accomplished by combining children’s ability to have fun and to play with the need for pumping water that could be stored in an above-ground tank.

Without having studied the situation in vollages fully, the inventor did not consider that by removing a single-user water pump, women could not operate the equipment by themselves when children were not present. The $60 million that was spent on the project was largely wasted. The pumps used by the children also needed far more repair than the sing-user pumps, and instead of keeping both pumps, the single-user pumps were also removed.

Ms. Mukamabano shared her experiences arising from being a survivor of the Rwandan genocide and then coming to terms with the question of why did she exist. The NGO that she founder, Kuki Ndiho Foundation, means “Why Do I Exist?”

As an artist, dancer, and entrepreneur, Ms. Mukamabano has worked with orphans in her native country, building hope with them by teaching them artistic skills.

Were it not for the presence of international NGOs such as World Vision and others in the refugee camp in which she found herself, she stated that God would have provided some other means during this very difficult time. For her, international NGOs do great goo.

There are aspects of non-profit work, though, that NGOs are not skillful at, such as accounting and creating business plans. At times, donors require projects to be completed within a certain timeframe, and in order to accomplish the goals on the ground, time often runs out on the recipient organization. Projects therefore cannot be sustained.

Ms. Mukamabano also played a short video of how sports and art can make an impact in the lives of orphans, and made a very skillful intervention later in the Q&A section of the program about the nature of the MDGs.

Ms. Hawke described her personal experience in Romania, which presents a complex situation with children who beg in the streets while their mothers, who often are unemployed, might be sitting in a park with nothing to do.

Her descriptions of the children that she encountered demonstrated that older children are not really impacted as much as younger children in programs that may help an entire family, since older children might migrate to another city or country.

Ms. Hawke felt that random control tests might be a mechanism by which to measure actual success of projects and the impact on the populations served.

A lively Q&A followed the presentations, dealing with real-life situations from the perspective of former Peace Corps volunteers and from those with experience of international NGOs in Haiti following the earthquake. Often, international NGOs are seen as sources of employment for local people, and that it is the international NGOs who often are able to reap unintended benefits from their presence on the ground.

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